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7:30 PM

BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 1 & 9

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Angel Blue - Soprano
Mihoko Fujimura - Mezzo-soprano
Rolando Villazón - Tenor
Quinn Kelsey - Baritone
Westminster Symphonic Choir and Community Voices
Joe Miller - Director
Beethoven - Symphony No. 1
Frank - Pachamama Meets an Ode - WORLD PREMIERE - PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA COMMISSION
Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 ("Choral")

Beethoven was just 25 when he wrote his First Symphony. Delightful and high-spirited, floating on strains of Mozart and Haydn, it's a fascinating glimpse of the greatness and genius to come—all on full, glorious display in the climactic Ninth. Written just a few short years before his death, Beethoven's profound ode to brotherhood, salvation, and pure joy reminds us why we are here as an orchestra, says Yannick, and why we constantly try to make our world better by playing music.

 
8:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 1 & 9

8:00 PM, Carnegie Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Angel Blue - Soprano
Mihoko Fujimura - Mezzo-soprano
Rolando Villazón - Tenor
Quinn Kelsey - Baritone
Westminster Symphonic Choir
Joe Miller - Director
Beethoven - Symphony No. 1
Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 ("Choral")

Enjoy a unique opportunity to hear Beethoven’s development as a symphonic composer in one evening with his first and last symphonies. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1 respects the traditions of his teacher Haydn, but surges with propulsive energy and intrigues with novel harmonies. The choral finale of Beethoven’s Ninth is revolutionary—it’s the first symphony to use voices—but its preceding movements also break new ground with their vast breadth and tremendous emotional power.

 
8:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 1 & 9

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Angel Blue - Soprano
Mihoko Fujimura - Mezzo-soprano
Rolando Villazón - Tenor
Quinn Kelsey - Baritone
Westminster Symphonic Choir and Community Voices
Joe Miller - Director
Beethoven - Symphony No. 1
Frank - Pachamama Meets an Ode - WORLD PREMIERE - PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA COMMISSION
Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 ("Choral")

Beethoven was just 25 when he wrote his First Symphony. Delightful and high-spirited, floating on strains of Mozart and Haydn, it's a fascinating glimpse of the greatness and genius to come—all on full, glorious display in the climactic Ninth. Written just a few short years before his death, Beethoven's profound ode to brotherhood, salvation, and pure joy reminds us why we are here as an orchestra, says Yannick, and why we constantly try to make our world better by playing music.

 
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2:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Symphonies 1 & 9

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Angel Blue - Soprano
Mihoko Fujimura - Mezzo-soprano
Rolando Villazón - Tenor
Quinn Kelsey - Baritone
Westminster Symphonic Choir and Community Voices
Joe Miller - Director
Beethoven - Symphony No. 1
Frank - Pachamama Meets an Ode - WORLD PREMIERE - PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA COMMISSION
Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 ("Choral")

Beethoven was just 25 when he wrote his First Symphony. Delightful and high-spirited, floating on strains of Mozart and Haydn, it's a fascinating glimpse of the greatness and genius to come—all on full, glorious display in the climactic Ninth. Written just a few short years before his death, Beethoven's profound ode to brotherhood, salvation, and pure joy reminds us why we are here as an orchestra, says Yannick, and why we constantly try to make our world better by playing music.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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2:00 PM

Thibaudet and Liszt

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Stéphane Denève - Conductor
Jean-Yves Thibaudet - Piano
Clyne - This Midnight Hour
Liszt - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Strauss - Ein Heldenleben

Stéphane Denève's final subscription concerts as the Orchestra's principal guest conductor culminate with Strauss's epic Ein Heldenleben—literally, A Hero's Life—an extravagant, all-encompassing, semi-autobiographical tone poem that quotes from his own prodigious masterpieces. Anna Clyne's imaginative This Midnight Hour, highlighting the power of the lower strings, evokes the journey of a mysterious woman “stripped bare, running mad through the night.” Liszt's heady Second Piano Concerto is gorgeous and technically challenging.

 
8:00 PM

Thibaudet and Liszt

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Stéphane Denève - Conductor
Jean-Yves Thibaudet - Piano
Clyne - This Midnight Hour
Liszt - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Strauss - Ein Heldenleben

Stéphane Denève's final subscription concerts as the Orchestra's principal guest conductor culminate with Strauss's epic Ein Heldenleben—literally, A Hero's Life—an extravagant, all-encompassing, semi-autobiographical tone poem that quotes from his own prodigious masterpieces. Anna Clyne's imaginative This Midnight Hour, highlighting the power of the lower strings, evokes the journey of a mysterious woman “stripped bare, running mad through the night.” Liszt's heady Second Piano Concerto is gorgeous and technically challenging.

 
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7:30 PM

Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Fabio Luisi - Conductor
Jeffrey Khaner - Flute
Sørensen - Evening Land
Nielsen - Flute Concerto
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5

Italian conductor Fabio Luisi returns to conduct a program that opens with Bent Sørensen’s Evening Land. The piece was inspired by an image of the evening light that Sørensen recalled from his childhood in Denmark. Principal Flute Jeffrey Khaner is especially pleased to be performing the Nielsen Concerto. “I love the back and forth in the orchestration; it's a lot of fun to play and listen to!” Famous for its ingenious use of a “fate” theme, Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony progresses from a somber beginning to an uplifting, triumphant march in the final movement. It's Tchaikovsky at his soulful best!

 
8:00 PM

Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Fabio Luisi - Conductor
Jeffrey Khaner - Flute
Sørensen - Evening Land
Nielsen - Flute Concerto
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5

Italian conductor Fabio Luisi returns to conduct a program that opens with Bent Sørensen’s Evening Land. The piece was inspired by an image of the evening light that Sørensen recalled from his childhood in Denmark. Principal Flute Jeffrey Khaner is especially pleased to be performing the Nielsen Concerto. “I love the back and forth in the orchestration; it's a lot of fun to play and listen to!” Famous for its ingenious use of a “fate” theme, Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony progresses from a somber beginning to an uplifting, triumphant march in the final movement. It's Tchaikovsky at his soulful best!

 
8:00 PM

Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Fabio Luisi - Conductor
Jeffrey Khaner - Flute
Sørensen - Evening Land
Nielsen - Flute Concerto
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5

Italian conductor Fabio Luisi returns to conduct a program that opens with Bent Sørensen’s Evening Land. The piece was inspired by an image of the evening light that Sørensen recalled from his childhood in Denmark. Principal Flute Jeffrey Khaner is especially pleased to be performing the Nielsen Concerto. “I love the back and forth in the orchestration; it's a lot of fun to play and listen to!” Famous for its ingenious use of a “fate” theme, Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony progresses from a somber beginning to an uplifting, triumphant march in the final movement. It's Tchaikovsky at his soulful best!

 
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7:30 PM

Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Tugan Sokhiev - Conductor
Lukas Geniušas - Piano
Firsova - The Garden of Dreams: Hommage to Shostakovich
Tchaikovsky - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Shostakovich - Symphony No. 5

Tchaikovsky's Second Piano Concerto may be overshadowed by his more famous First, but it's the piece that earned Lukas Geniušas top honors at the Tchaikovsky Competition. Balanchine, too, recognized its consummate beauty, choosing it as the score for his tribute to classical Russian ballet. The government decided what was art when Shostakovich wrote his vehement and complicated Fifth Symphony under an oppressive Soviet regime (and threat of the Gulag).

 
 
 

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Format: 2020-04-06