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8:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Daniil Trifonov

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Daniil Trifonov - Piano
Boulanger - Of a Sad Evening
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 5 ("Emperor")
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Farrenc - Symphony No. 2

Daniil Trifonov, the Orchestra's Grammy-winning recording partner, returns for four performances. Amplifying the programs are two underappreciated works by formidable women composers: Lili Boulanger, the first woman to win, in 1913, the prestigious Prix de Rome composition prize, and Louise Farrenc, whose Symphony No. 2 dialogues with Beethoven, and leaves us asking why her works are not a more integral part of the canon today.

 
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2:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Daniil Trifonov

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Daniil Trifonov - Piano
Boulanger - Of a Sad Evening
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 5 ("Emperor")
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Farrenc - Symphony No. 2

Daniil Trifonov, the Orchestra's Grammy-winning recording partner, returns for four performances. Amplifying the programs are two underappreciated works by formidable women composers: Lili Boulanger, the first woman to win, in 1913, the prestigious Prix de Rome composition prize, and Louise Farrenc, whose Symphony No. 2 dialogues with Beethoven, and leaves us asking why her works are not a more integral part of the canon today.

 
 
 
 
7:30 PM

BeethovenNOW: Emanuel Ax

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Karina Canellakis - Conductor
Emanuel Ax - Piano
Di Castri - Lineage
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Lutoslawski - Concerto for Orchestra

Beethoven composed “the most positive music ever written,” with every work containing “every emotion known to man,” says Emanuel Ax, who completes our piano concerto cycle. Beethoven made his public debut with his Second Concerto, a dramatic, humorous, ebullient work that announced the young artist's arrival.

 
8:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Emanuel Ax

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Karina Canellakis - Conductor
Emanuel Ax - Piano
Di Castri - Lineage
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 3
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Lutoslawski - Concerto for Orchestra

Beethoven composed “the most positive music ever written,” with every work containing “every emotion known to man,” says Emanuel Ax, who completes our piano concerto cycle. Beethoven made his public debut with his Second Concerto, a dramatic, humorous, ebullient work that announced the young artist's arrival.

 
10:00 AM

Sound All Around: Brass

10:00 AM, Academy of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Matthew Vaughn - Trombone
Hugh Sung - Piano

Presenting: the brass family! Philadelphia Orchestra musician Matt Vaughn will guide the audience through this regal instrument family.

 
11:15 AM

Sound All Around: Brass

11:15 AM, Academy of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Matthew Vaughn - Trombone
Hugh Sung - Piano

Presenting: the brass family! The brass family is the loudest of the orchestra, and can be heard from far, far away, making its instruments perfect for fanfares and announcements. This family includes the trumpet, trombone, French horn, and tuba. Brass players produce sound by buzzing their lips into the mouthpiece. Philadelphia Orchestra musician Matt Vaughn will guide the audience through this regal instrument family.

 
8:00 PM

BeethovenNOW: Emanuel Ax

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Karina Canellakis - Conductor
Emanuel Ax - Piano
Di Castri - Lineage
Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Lutoslawski - Concerto for Orchestra

Beethoven composed “the most positive music ever written,” with every work containing “every emotion known to man,” says Emanuel Ax, who completes our piano concerto cycle. Beethoven made his public debut with his Second Concerto, a dramatic, humorous, ebullient work that announced the young artist's arrival.

 
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10:00 AM

Sound All Around: Brass

10:00 AM, Academy of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Matthew Vaughn - Trombone
Hugh Sung - Piano

Presenting: the brass family! The brass family is the loudest of the orchestra, and can be heard from far, far away, making its instruments perfect for fanfares and announcements. This family includes the trumpet, trombone, French horn, and tuba. Brass players produce sound by buzzing their lips into the mouthpiece. Philadelphia Orchestra musician Matt Vaughn will guide the audience through this regal instrument family.

 
11:15 AM

Sound All Around: Brass

11:15 AM, Academy of Music Ballroom
Charlotte Blake Alston - Host and Storyteller
Matthew Vaughn - Trombone
Hugh Sung - Piano

Presenting: the brass family! The brass family is the loudest of the orchestra, and can be heard from far, far away, making its instruments perfect for fanfares and announcements. This family includes the trumpet, trombone, French horn, and tuba. Brass players produce sound by buzzing their lips into the mouthpiece. Philadelphia Orchestra musician Matt Vaughn will guide the audience through this regal instrument family.

 
 
 
7:30 PM

Sorcerers, Spells, and Magic

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Stéphane Denève - Conductor
Isabel Leonard - Mezzo-soprano (The Child)
Anna Christy - Soprano (The Fire, The Nightingale, The Princess)
Meigui Zhang - Soprano (The Bergère, The Bat, The Screech-owl, A Country Lass)
Valentina Pluzhnikova - Mezzo-soprano (The White Cat, The Squirrel, A Herdsman)
Sara Couden - Contralto (Mama, The Chinese Cup, The Dragonfly)
Mathias Vidal - Tenor (The Teapot, The Little Old Man, The Tree Frog)
John Moore - Baritone (The Comtoise Clock, The Black Cat)
Yunpeng Wang - Baritone (The Armchair, A Tree)
Westminster Symphonic Choir
Joe Miller - Director
Philadelphia Boys Choir
Jeffrey R. Smith - Artistic Director
Omer Ben Seadia - Stage Director
Mozart - Overture to The Magic Flute
Dukas - The Sorcerer's Apprentice
Williams - Selections from Harry Potter
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Ravel - L'Enfant et les sortilèges

The Philadelphia Orchestra celebrates Valentine's weekend with spellbinding music, beginning with Mozart's bewitching The Magic Flute. Magic takes a darker turn in The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Dukas's symphonic poem immortalized by Mickey Mouse battling demonic brooms in Fantasia. Stéphane Denève is a passionate exponent of John Williams's endlessly creative music for the cinema, represented here by his spookily charming Harry Potter scores.

 
2:00 PM

Sorcerers, Spells, and Magic

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Stéphane Denève - Conductor
Isabel Leonard - Mezzo-soprano (The Child)
Anna Christy - Soprano (The Fire, The Nightingale, The Princess)
Meigui Zhang - Soprano (The Bergère, The Bat, The Screech-owl, A Country Lass)
Valentina Pluzhnikova - Mezzo-soprano (The White Cat, The Squirrel, A Herdsman)
Sara Couden - Contralto (Mama, The Chinese Cup, The Dragonfly)
Mathias Vidal - Tenor (The Teapot, The Little Old Man, The Tree Frog)
John Moore - Baritone (The Comtoise Clock, The Black Cat)
Yunpeng Wang - Baritone (The Armchair, A Tree)
Westminster Symphonic Choir
Joe Miller - Director
Philadelphia Boys Choir
Jeffrey R. Smith - Artistic Director
Omer Ben Seadia - Stage Director
Mozart - Overture to The Magic Flute
Dukas - The Sorcerer's Apprentice
Williams - Selections from Harry Potter
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Ravel - L'Enfant et les sortilèges

The Philadelphia Orchestra celebrates Valentine's weekend with spellbinding music, beginning with Mozart's bewitching The Magic Flute. Magic takes a darker turn in The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Dukas's symphonic poem immortalized by Mickey Mouse battling demonic brooms in Fantasia. Stéphane Denève is a passionate exponent of John Williams's endlessly creative music for the cinema, represented here by his spookily charming Harry Potter scores.

 
8:00 PM

Sorcerers, Spells, and Magic

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Stéphane Denève - Conductor
Isabel Leonard - Mezzo-soprano (The Child)
Anna Christy - Soprano (The Fire, The Nightingale, The Princess)
Meigui Zhang - Soprano (The Bergère, The Bat, The Screech-owl, A Country Lass)
Valentina Pluzhnikova - Mezzo-soprano (The White Cat, The Squirrel, A Herdsman)
Sara Couden - Contralto (Mama, The Chinese Cup, The Dragonfly)
Mathias Vidal - Tenor (The Teapot, The Little Old Man, The Tree Frog)
John Moore - Baritone (The Comtoise Clock, The Black Cat)
Yunpeng Wang - Baritone (The Armchair, A Tree)
Westminster Symphonic Choir
Joe Miller - Director
Philadelphia Boys Choir
Jeffrey R. Smith - Artistic Director
Omer Ben Seadia - Stage Director
Mozart - Overture to The Magic Flute
Dukas - The Sorcerer's Apprentice
Williams - Selections from Harry Potter
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Ravel - L'Enfant et les sortilèges

The Philadelphia Orchestra celebrates Valentine's weekend with spellbinding music, beginning with Mozart's bewitching The Magic Flute. Magic takes a darker turn in The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Dukas's symphonic poem immortalized by Mickey Mouse battling demonic brooms in Fantasia. Stéphane Denève is a passionate exponent of John Williams's endlessly creative music for the cinema, represented here by his spookily charming Harry Potter scores.

 
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7:30 PM

Symphonie fantastique

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Herbert Blomstedt - Conductor
Lise de la Salle - Piano
Mendelssohn - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Berlioz - Symphonie fantastique

Mendelssohn wrote his Second Piano Concerto right after he got married and there's plenty of joy expressed, especially in the final movement, which the composer himself described as “piano fireworks.” He was the soloist at the premiere in 1837. The young French pianist Lise de la Salle (“For much of the concert, the audience had to remember to breathe…” –The Washington Post) is a riveting choice to interpret this concerto. Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique is a tour de force of compositional color, a breakthrough that set the stage for his most assured writing.

 
2:00 PM

Symphonie fantastique

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Herbert Blomstedt - Conductor
Lise de la Salle - Piano
Mendelssohn - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Berlioz - Symphonie fantastique

Mendelssohn wrote his Second Piano Concerto right after he got married and there's plenty of joy expressed, especially in the final movement, which the composer himself described as “piano fireworks.” He was the soloist at the premiere in 1837. The young French pianist Lise de la Salle (“For much of the concert, the audience had to remember to breathe…” –The Washington Post) is a riveting choice to interpret this concerto. Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique is a tour de force of compositional color, a breakthrough that set the stage for his most assured writing.

 
8:00 PM

Symphonie fantastique

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Herbert Blomstedt - Conductor
Lise de la Salle - Piano
Mendelssohn - Piano Concerto No. 2
INTERMISSION - Intermission
Berlioz - Symphonie fantastique

Mendelssohn wrote his Second Piano Concerto right after he got married and there's plenty of joy expressed, especially in the final movement, which the composer himself described as “piano fireworks.” He was the soloist at the premiere in 1837. The young French pianist Lise de la Salle (“For much of the concert, the audience had to remember to breathe…” –The Washington Post) is a riveting choice to interpret this concerto. Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique is a tour de force of compositional color, a breakthrough that set the stage for his most assured writing.

 
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7:30 PM

Elgar’s “Enigma” Variations

7:30 PM, Verizon Hall
Edward Gardner - Conductor
Paul Jacobs - Organ
Britten - Sinfonia da Requiem
Daugherty - Once Upon a Castle, for organ and orchestra
Elgar - “Enigma” Variations

What exactly is Elgar's "enigma?" We may never know but we can still enjoy these 14 charming variations on a theme that Elgar composed "to my friends pictured within." British conductor Edward Gardner, chief conductor of the Bergen Philharmonic and principal conductor designate of the London Philharmonic, makes his Philadelphia Orchestra debut, and keyboard virtuoso Paul Jacobs returns to the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ.

 
2:00 PM

Elgar’s “Enigma” Variations

2:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Edward Gardner - Conductor
Paul Jacobs - Organ
Britten - Sinfonia da Requiem
Daugherty - Once Upon a Castle, for organ and orchestra
Elgar - “Enigma” Variations

What exactly is Elgar's "enigma?" We may never know but we can still enjoy these 14 charming variations on a theme that Elgar composed "to my friends pictured within." British conductor Edward Gardner, chief conductor of the Bergen Philharmonic and principal conductor designate of the London Philharmonic, makes his Philadelphia Orchestra debut, and keyboard virtuoso Paul Jacobs returns to the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ.

 
8:00 PM

Elgar’s “Enigma” Variations

8:00 PM, Verizon Hall
Edward Gardner - Conductor
Paul Jacobs - Organ
Britten - Sinfonia da Requiem
Daugherty - Once Upon a Castle, for organ and orchestra
Elgar - “Enigma” Variations

What exactly is Elgar's "enigma?" We may never know but we can still enjoy these 14 charming variations on a theme that Elgar composed "to my friends pictured within." British conductor Edward Gardner, chief conductor of the Bergen Philharmonic and principal conductor designate of the London Philharmonic, makes his Philadelphia Orchestra debut, and keyboard virtuoso Paul Jacobs returns to the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ.

 

Calendar

Format: 2020-02-25